High-Conflict Co-Parenting Tips

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As the experts at Clarke University say, “conflict is natural and happens in every ongoing relationship.” Co-parenting is a unique relationship between people and one that will have tense moments. While that may seem like a surprising way to start a blog on managing conflict with your co-parent, it is necessary to recognize that it is normal to disagree over time.

However, not all disputes need to be a bad thing. Conflict can allow co-parents to work through challenges and communicate to find a solution that will benefit their children. High-conflict co-parenting relationships can change over time as co-parents find techniques that work for them.



Kids First

No matter what your co-parent says or does, your relationship with that person centers around your children. Do your best to set aside your emotions to focus on the impact that your conversation will have on your kids.
  • Can you find a solution that benefits them?
  • How can this conflict be resolved for them?
Try to minimize instances of arguing in front of the children. In the cases when you do have a heated conversation or disagreement with the children within earshot, take the time to demonstrate your problem-solving skills after the fact. Explain that sometimes parents can believe different things, but that you have talked about it and things are ok.
 

Setting Boundaries

As we discussed in our blog, Co-Parenting Boundaries, some co-parents find it helpful to think of their co-parent like a business partner. You should respectfully communicate with them to accomplish a shared goal.

When you feel disrespected, offended, or just plain uncomfortable with the other person's actions, it may be because they have crossed a boundary for you. If that is the case, consider our next tip.

Cool Down

As Weinberger Divorce & Family Law Group writes, remember that not every message needs a response right away. Before responding with an angry message that may escalate the situation, take a few deep breaths to think about how you want to answer your co-parent.

If someone tends to be a high-conflict personality, they might be more sensitive to others’ emotions. Keeping your emotions in check can help you de-escalate a conversation as well.


Paraphrasing

Conflicts can get worse when we misunderstand what is being said by the other person. To stop that from happening, repeat back to your co-parent what you hear them saying to make sure that you understand them correctly. This communication method gives your co-parent the chance to clarify what they are talking about or to confirm that you are on the same page.

Start sentences with “I” to talk about how a conversation is making you feel or what you think. Your co-parent will understand that you are talking about yourself, and not blaming them for something else.

Focus on the Future

Not all conflicts will end in a win-win. But when co-parents focus on their shared interests and goals that they have for their children, it is easier to find a compromise.

Dr. Edward Kruk from Psychology Today recommends that co-parents make it their goal to reduce conflicts when possible. One way to do this is to build a team of professionals that can help you negotiate and mediate high-conflict situations. You can find mediators, lawyers, and co-parent counselors that can help you communicate more effectively. 
 

TalkingParents Can Help

TalkingParents built an accountable and secure platform designed to help co-parents communicate more effectively. 

With the introduction of Accountable Calling℠, co-parents can now have unalterable conversations via a Call in addition to our existing features. All of the communications between co-parents are a part of their TalkingParents Record that they can bring to court or use in mediation if necessary.

Learn about the benefits of a co-parenting app

TalkingParents blogs are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as legal advice. Always consult with a qualified attorney regarding legal matters.